ONE TRACK MIND: McKinley Moore talks about the making of Pleasure Boys -“The Earth is Fucking Round”

Every time I’m reminded that some ding dong thinks that the Earth is flat, I want to die a little (just a little, let’s not get out of hand). Even in spite of centuries worth of proof to the contrary, it’s almost impossible to sort out the cognitive dissonance required for that poorly held belief. How can anyone believe in a conspiracy of that size? And who benefits from it? Big-sphere? Gimme a break. Enter Pleasure Boys, who’ve had it up to here with your stupid anti-science meanderings. Speaking to McKinley Moore about their latest single, it becomes apparent that this is less about trying to change the hearts and minds of people dead set on their chosen narrative, but in giving one last middle finger at the end of the world, in the calmest, chillest way possible. Check out the song below, listen to their newest release here, and read more about the track that earned singer/guitarist McKinley Moore the term “Globehead.” 

Never Nervous: What inspired the song title? Why do you think we’re still having to argue the roundness of the Earth in 2017?

McKinley Moore: Flat Earth theory seemed like a pretty funny joke when I first heard it. Like especially the ones that believe there’s another society living in the middle of the Earth somehow. Those are my favorite. But now I’ve seen real humans that I know actually treat it like it has some real fucking basis in science. Some of them are smart people. Some of them teach children. It’s terrifying. It’s like when King Dipshit got elected some people just decided to drink the goddamn Kool Aid. “Facts don’t matter. Fuck it. Gravity is fake news or whatever.” In short I think we’re having to argue about the roundness of Earth in 2018, because we’re fucking doomed as a species.

NN: What was the response to this track if any? Did you get any push back from anyone about pushing a pro-round Earth (read: logic) agenda?

MM: The only pushback I really got was from when I joined a bunch of flat Earth groups on Facebook so I could post the track there. Someone called me a globehead, which was awesome. I was completely unaware that there was a derogatory term for a person that believe the Earth is round.

NN: How do you compose? Was the music put together first and then the concept attached after the fact, or were they relative to one another? What is the core riff? How did everyone work to that central motif and how did it evolve during the compositional process?

MM: We usually make stuff up together at practice. I’ll have like a little part or something and then everyone else jumps in and makes it way better. Sometimes I don’t even keep playing the part I came up with. I just let it go be this awesome thing. We recorded this with Jim Marlowe as a 3 piece (drums, bass, guitar) as it was the freshest thing we had and I don’t think everyone had even played it before. Nic and I took that and added a bunch of synth stuff to it later.

NN: Does the relaxed feel of the track serve as a tacit response to anyone that may disagree with the premise? Like, maybe it remains at a leisurely pace, because it’s not worth getting especially angry over.

MM: I guess that’s kind of what it is. “Hey, I think you’re a fucking idiot and I’m gonna tell you about it. But I’m not gonna let myself get too worked up about it.” Calling someone’s beliefs stupid is way more effective if done so in a calm manner.

NN: Why is the narrative to the track carried by a spoken word piece? Why is that voice obscured? Was it hard to find someone to discuss the science?

MM: Finding someone to discuss the science was not hard. It was a person who I’ve had many such conversations with. It wasn’t set to the music. I sent her a message and asked for some scientific facts that disprove flat Earthers. She had apparently just quit smoking the day before so I ended up getting like six and half minutes of rage. It was perfect. Then Nic and I ran the spoken word track through both of our pedal boards once at the same time and turned the magic knobs while we recorded it. Then we chopped it up and added it to the instrumental and it was perfect. Finding spoken word and setting it to music is a thing we are very much into. (See also No Dancing at the Bistro on our first record)