INTERVIEW: A quick chat with Chuck Mosley on his amazing career, Jonathan Davis, & the one that got away!

Chuck Mosley has led a storied life. He came to fame fronting a nascent, pre-Mike Patton Faith No More, carrying the bands through their first two albums, before leaving around 1990. From there, Mosley took a brief stint fronting seminal afro-punk act Bad Brains, before leaving to form Cement. After a serious accident that led to a broken back for Mosley, the band was disassembled, with Mosley moving to Ohio, where he spent years working in isolation while raising a family. Now part of Chuck Mosley and the VUA, he’s visiting Louisville to perform a variety of hits throughout his career, mixing up the new and old. You can catch him Saturday, October 14th at the Cure Lounge with Bird/Trooper. We caught up with him to ask about his work with Faith No More, his new band, and curing the world with hot jams!

Never Nervous: What was your relationship to music growing up?

Chuck Mosley: It was all around with my family. Started with the Beatles.

NN: How did your formative years with family shape your style?

CM: It made me complicated.

NN: What was your first band?

CM: The Animated

NN: What did that teach you about working in music?

CM: Taught me that it’s what I wanted to do the rest of my life.

NN: How did you hook up with the Faith No More folks?

CM: Billy and I were in The Animated together. It use grew from there.

NN: How did your relationship evolve over the course of the two albums?

CM: Like a Marriage.

“My time with Bad Brains was like punk rock boot camp. High demands were set upon me. They liked and used everything I did. They did have a preference for me to remain positive, which I did.”

NN: What led you to work with Bad Brains?

CM: They called me up.

NN: Were you a fan of their music before?

CM: Yeah, yup.

NN: Was it a challenge to step into HR’s shoes? Any burden stepping into that role?

CM: Yep. My time with Bad Brains was like punk rock boot camp. High demands were set upon me. They liked and used everything I did. They did have a preference for me to remain positive, which I did.

NN: Tell us about your current project. How did it start and how has it evolved?

CM: Started last year when me and Doug went out as a two piece and it has evolved into a four piece with an expanded sound. Wrote twelve new songs and recorded seven of them with Matt Wallace. The project has allowed me to explore the more hypnotic noises.

NN: How would you describe your current work?

CM: It’s a rollercoaster ride of emotion, elation, and hypnotic syncopation.

NN: Does the fact you operate under your own name come with any expectation? Do you ever feel encumbered under the weight of your own catalog?

CM: Yes, it’s weird, but I have to tell myself that I’ve gradated to the level of a David Bowie or Iggy Pop. Then I don’t think about it, and it’s okay.

NN: If your music could cure one ill in the world, what would it be and why?

“It was an honor and a privilege to work with Jonathan Davis.”

CM: Hatred, because that’s what kills most people aside from natural disasters.

NN: Have you watched, eaten, read, or drank anything recently worth mentioning?

CM: Mango Aloe Vera is my favorite thing. Wings in buffalo.

NN: Who did you enjoy collaborating with?

CM: It was an honor and a privilege to work with Jonathan Davis.

NN: Any collaborators that got away?

CM: David Bowie got away.

NN: Who would you erase and why?

CM: I’d say Hitler, but we don’t learn from our mistakes.

NN: Top Three desert island album picks?

CM: I’m guessing it’s a desert island with electricity?

So, any Portishead, Hunky-Dory or Ziggy Stardust, and Stevie Wonder Inner Visions.