REVIEW: Anagnorisis – “Peripeteia” 

Anagnorisis
Peripeteia
Vendetta Records

From Merriam-Webster’s dictionary:

Anagnosris – the point in the plot especially of a tragedy at which the protagonist recognizes his or her or some other character’s true identity or discovers the true nature of his or her own situation.

Peripiteia – a sudden or unexpected reversal of circumstances (turning point) or situation especially in a literary work.

With their latest release Anagnorisis have used the genre of black metal to create an album that is ultra personal. Probably more personal than your favorite folk album at the moment. That’s not the typical path that we see bands of this genre take. Similar to my love for horror movies, I find black metal to be a fun escape that makes me feel powerful, or at least like I don’t have to be afraid of everything. Peripeteia may have helped it’s writer escape his own demons, but listening to it is a journey into real life darkness.

The album is essentially an autobiography of the singer and protagonist Zachary Kerr. Instead of hearing the typical satanic black metal tropes, we are getting a glimpse at what it is that brings a person to black metal. Why did little Zach grow into the frontman for Louisville’s premiere black metal outfit? The answer’s lie inside.

The story’s intimacy is heightened by the real life recordings of Zach as a child that are sampled throughout the album. Most of it is some kind of odd interview. You get the feeling that he was part of a science experiment. It’s unsettling, maybe more than it should be because the origin of it is unknown. It also adds an authenticity to the album that is inescapable.

Normally on an album review I’ll pick a few choice tracks to write about. It’s a boring formula music writers fall into to fill space. I’m not going to do that here because I never listened to Peripeteia one track at a time. The entire album feels like one track. It deserves to be listened to in it’s entirety. Especially if you are a fan of the genre, you can’t turn away from this powerful work of art. But for the record, I really like “Metamorphosis.”

Listen to Peripeteia in its entirety below: